Bible Diary English

April 30, 2022

First Reading: Acts 6:1-7
Psalm:  Ps 33:1-2, 4-5, 18-19
Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.
Gospel:  Jn 6:16-21

Sat: Easter Weekday/ Pius V, pp, r

Acts 6: 1-7/ Ps 33: 1-2. 4-5. 18-19/ Jn 6: 16-21

1st Reading: Acts 6:1-7
In those days, as the number of disciples grew, so-called ­Hellenists complained against the so-called Hebrews, because their widows were being neglected in the daily distribution. So the Twelve summoned the whole body of disciples together, and said, “It is not right, that we should neglect the word of God to serve at tables. So, friends, choose from among yourselves seven respected men, full of Spirit and wisdom, that we may appoint them to this task. As for us, we shall give ourselves to prayer, and to the ministry of the word.”
The whole community agreed; and they chose Stephen, a man full of faith and the Holy Spirit; Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Timon, Parmenus and Nicolaus of Antioch, who was a proselyte. They presented these men to the apostles, who, first prayed over them, and then, laid hands upon them.
The word of God continued to spread, and the number of the disciples in Jerusalem increased greatly; and even many priests accepted the faith.

Responsorial Psalm; Ps 33:1-2, 4-5, 18-19
Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.

Gospel: Jn 6:16-21
When evening came, the disciples went down to the shore. After a while, they got into a boat to make for Capernaum on the other side of the sea, for it was now dark and Jesus had not yet come to them. But the sea was getting rough because a strong wind was blowing.
They had rowed about three or four miles, when they saw Jesus walking on the sea, and he was drawing near to the boat. They were frightened, but he said to them, “It is I! Don’t be afraid!”
They wanted to take him into the boat, but immediately, the boat was at the shore to which they were going.

 

Reflection:

 

Plasticity of Prayer
It was evening. A couple of parishioners were at the presbytery, chatting away with two priests. As the time for the community prayers approached, one of the priests got up and said, “Nice talking to you. But I need to go.” Though he didn’t mention the reason, the parishioners understood, and one of them said, “Oh, fathers, it must be time for your prayers. Then we should also get going.” But the second priest cut in and said, “No, no, that is alright. We can pray some other time also. Talking to you is also prayer.” And the friendly chat continued without interruption. Contrast the sentiments in the above anecdote with the words of Peter on the non-negotiability of prayer: “It is not right, that we should neglect the word of God…We shall give ourselves to prayer, and to the ministry of the word.” In this difference in approach to prayer between the above two anecdotes, you may discover a partial cause to the crisis in ecclesial leadership today.